Topics
More on Strategic Planning

Brigham and Women's pilot drives down cost and utilization with 'home hospital' model

The average direct cost for acute care episodes for home patients was about half of the cost of the control patients cared for in the hospital.

Jeff Lagasse, Associate Editor

A pilot study by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital reimagines the best place to care for select, acutely ill adults. The project poses the question: What if, instead of being admitted and receiving care at a hospital, a patient could be cared for at home, and monitored using cutting-edge technology? 

The results, according to the study, would be decreased costs and utilization, as well as improved physical activity for patients.

Researchers examined the model's impact on direct cost as well as utilization, safety, quality, and patient experience. Results of the pilot project are reported this week in The Journal of General Internal Medicine.

A total of 20 adult patients admitted to the emergency department at Brigham and Women's Hospital or Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital were recruited for the study. Eligible participants included patients with any infection or exacerbations of heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma. Participants also had to live in the surrounding area of the hospital to qualify for the study. Nine patients were randomized to receive care at home while 11 received usual care within the hospital setting.

Patients who were cared for at home received a daily visit from an attending general internist and two daily visits from a home health registered nurse. The home hospital model also offered 24-hour physician coverage and cutting-edge connectivity, including continuous monitoring, video and texting. Patients in either arm of the study were interviewed on admission, at discharge and 30-days after discharge.

The authors found that the average direct cost for acute care episodes for home patients was about half of the cost of the control patients cared for in the hospital. The pilot study's primary outcome was direct cost, but the researchers also looked at other, secondary measures. They found that the home hospital model also decreased utilization and improved physical activity, without appreciably changing quality, safety or patient experience.

Advantages of the home hospital model, they said, include patients being surrounded by family and friends, eating their own food, and sleeping and moving about in their own home.

The team is currently conducting a larger-scale trial to demonstrate the pilot results in a larger group of patients.

Twitter: @JELagasse
Email the writer: jeff.lagasse@himssmedia.com

Show All Comments